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 Comics Portfolio 4

Published Blurred Vision Stories (2005-2008): By the end of my output of “experimental comics,” I was simply dumping everything into either Epic Dermis n2 or Epic Dermis n3 out of my maniacal compunction to group things together. This was a clear indication that I had run out of fight for the comic page form. I turned my attention next to Blender Kitty and (more productively) to comic strips. Such was my disposition until Blurred Vision contacted me.

Specter of Dentistry from Blurred Vision n1.

Specter of Dentistry comic

Specter of Dentistry was the first of four comics published by the comics anthology Blurred Vision. The three remaining comics were text stories. The Significant Other was not published in the anthology, although it provided the template for storyboards of this time. These story-length comics were made expressly for Blurred Vision at the time they were solicited, and during my production cycle of Profiles in Confusion strips.

The Significant Other comicTeavelogue of An Unemployed Pinhead comicNow is The Winter of My Heart comic

 

Walking-Around Zombie was the last comic to appear in Blurred Vision before the anthology ceased publication.

Walking-Around Zombie

 

Short Form and The Sprinter: I never excelled at writing involved narrative comics, chiefly due to mechanics. Significant labor must be dedicated to generating initial elements of a plot early, though after several months of commitment to it, one may come to judge this plot as weak. It is all but impossible to infuse new ideas and perspectives into a story that, drawing wise, is well underway. It would be like moving the construction site of The Empire State Building, one brick at a time, to accommodate. (This developmental problem is reproduced at a smaller scale in painting.)

This is why I never seriously pursued full-length linear comics and why I prefer conceptual comics and stand-alone panels: Conciseness is their salvation. Virtues in short form become vices in long form. A story, once the storyteller commences it, can only grow in one direction: the direction envisioned from the outset; and before the storyteller may form a deeper understanding for why he or she struck out on this path. My wariness on this score is not widely shared however, and the problem I describe is not a problem for those who simply want a story and pictures to go with it. Over-thinking does not impress graphic novel creators, or convince them that their modest ambitions are missed opportunities. This is not a criticism, since graphic novel creators get along nicely without my opinions.

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