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 Original Music 2018

Palindrome

 Palindrome

6 minutes 1 seconds| Many themes here lay in pieces until the bitter end, and in different keys. The real business begins after the bridge. A theme repeats with variation, and when a development section occurs, the French horn soars into it. Brass instruments always impress in these situations. The uptempo coda was written early and sat around as a fragment. It comes on first as an interruption, playing nice until it breaks away in a key change after a big concert finale wind–up-and-pitch. It goes full throttle until it is interrupted, quite suddenly, by the end of the piece.

A preponderance of horns has lately invaded my music, or at least I failed, to the present moment, to grasp the shining effect of a trumpet where it carries the melody, or a French horn where it wails (somewhat belatedly) in being left behind.

The time stamp records 2/27/18 as the date when the thumbnail was made, so this is close to the complettion date.

Record Icon Monophonic Testing: No testing method is better when mixing a recording than to use a small monophonic speaker for playback. This temporary tool presents the music as it actually sounds without the division of stereo clouding the picture. Here you can hear those bass and midrange tones when they boom, or when an instrument is too loud or too soft in the mix. By setting up the speaker on my desk, the vibrations similarly give me a physical sense of how well blended the sound is.

Reverb does not translate well to the monophonic method. It is a generally volume robber at the low end, and a volume augmentator at the high end. It should be used sparingly, and sometimes as little as one or two instruments carrying the effect will convey the desired atmosphere.

Other effects like echo can also be a problem, as they can pop up in monophonic playback like loose tacks in a poorly installed carpet. In the case of Garageband software synthesizers and loops, one is sometimes limited in how to accommodate their undesired effects.

Another good practice for mixing is to turn the music up as loud as you can bear and trim or accentuate a instrument track as the occasion demands.

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