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 Mixed Media on Paper: 2019-2010

Scalability: Pictorial space is often sacrificed in my painting, no doubt due to my education in Twentieth century Modernism, but also because of my love of parts of things. This sacrifice is most evident in my works on paper where details are best scalable with pens and markers. The artist working on paper feels less inhibited in dissecting and embellishing objects. For the same reason, watercolor enables one to achieve higher levels of detail at smaller spaces than oil. Watercolor, like pencils, ink, and alcohol-based markers, offers little inertia where the brush makes contact with its substrate. Only pigment suspended in a thin fluid is involved. This means there is little residue or filler that spreads outward from the mark, which prohibits scales of the finest gradation. (More remarks about watercolor below.)

Works on paper (by which I mean drawing) are to painting what chamber music is to the symphony: Away from creating war horses and other monumentally significant work, the intimate “no-pressure” mood that surrounds a pencil and piece of paper can be liberating. Often in these settings one finds an artist’s most daring and original ideas. Types of mixed media used in these works are discussed on my gallery page featuring older works on paper.

Birds of Partition (drawing on toned paper)

  Birds of Partition

12" x 12" graphite and white charcoal on toned paper

 

Birds of Partition

  Birds of Partition (detail)

 

Pancreas of Pants Crease

  Pancreas of Pants Crease

9" x 12" mixed media on paper

 

Sentient Ginger

  Sentient Ginger

9" x 12" mixed media on paper

 

Loose Morals and Bicuspids

  Loose Morals and Bicuspids

12" x 12" graphite and white charcoal on toned paper

 

Loose Morals and Bicuspids

  Loose Morals and Bicuspids (detail)

 

Dattchi Waifu

  Dattchi Waifu

9" x 12" mixed media on paper

 

Modular Immodesty

  Modular Immodesty

9" x 12" mixed media on paper

 

Gasoline Glove Double Hat

  Gasoline Glove Double Hat

9" x 12" color pencil on paper

 

Prolapsed Pro Forma

  Prolapsed Pro Forma

9" x 12" mixed media on paper

 

Passenger Precept

  Passenger Precept

12" x 12" graphite and white charcoal on toned paper

 

Indeed and Inferior

  Indeed and Inferior

9" x 12" mixed media on paper

 

 Earlier Works

Oil verses Watercolor: Oil painting is incapable of tiny marks unless the medium is thinned with a solvent or “fine-detail” linseed oil. Here one imitates watercolor or airbrush acrylic by applying color transparently. Upon examination, there is little to distinguish this thin style of painting from a photographic surface, apart from the obvious use of an artist’s brush to achieve this effect. The reason why I prefer oil for realism to watercolor lies in its irreducible dimension: Oil paint does not merely reproduce a realistic object faithfully, it recreates it as a tactile surface which extends outward from the canvas toward the careful viewer. Although this limits how small realistic details may go, one can simply engineer around the difficulty by scaling up the painting. In summary, watercolors are flat and oils are sculptural. I no longer paint in watercolor: My dabbling in this medium did not extend far beyond a course I took as an undergraduate. (See the first page of my Portfolio pages for an example.) The works on paper presented here are more versatile in that the multimedia approach offers many more creative opportunities.

Pathogen Annoyance

  Pathogen Annoyance

9" x 11.5" mixed media on paper

 

Foiled Plot Chocolat

  Foiled Plot Chocolat

8" x  8.5" mixed media on paper

 

Captions of Industry

  Captions of Industry

9" x 11.5" pen and ink on paper

 

Catheters Entreat

  Catheters Entreat

9" x 11.5" pen and ink on paper

 

Shark Cartilege Cartwheel

  Shark Cartilege Cartwheel

9" x 11.5" mixed media on paper

 

Fluid Situation

  Fluid Situation

9" x 11.5" pen and ink on paper

 

Literal Cardboard

  Literal Cardboard

9" x 11.5" mixed media on paper

 

Tree Rings and Coffee Stains: I am a poor historian of my creative work, and can only group my paintings (and, more so, my drawings) into relative periods. I emphasis drawing in this division because much of the work seen on this page dates from when I drew at coffeehouses, so I am able to identify these pieces chronologically by which coffeehouse I frequented at the time.

Light in cafe environments is poor at best, and as my eyesight has deteriorated over the years, my ability to pursue a course of drawing outside my studio has decreased. All of my comic work dating from the late 80s through early 90s was drawn at The Runcible Spoon (Bloomington, IN), while Blender Kitty, in its prosperous years, was drawn at a campus Starbucks with large sunny plate glass windows: It is possible that Air Quotes Invective and Bio-Regrettable date from this residency. Pour House claims the largest number of works cataloged on this page, although works of greatest detail were made at my drawing desk at home (studio seen on my Blog page).

Vanitas Food Cart

  Vanitas Food Cart

9" x 12" graphite and white charcoal on toned paper

 

Plinth of Limb and Latitude

  Plinth of Limb and Latitude

9" x 12" mixed media on paper

 

The Easter Premise

  The Easter Premise

9" x 12" mixed media on paper

 

Thews and Thrice Refused

  Thews and Thrice Refused

9" x 12" mixed media on paper

 

Air Quotes Invective

  Air Quotes Invective

9" x 11.5" pen and ink on paper

 

Bio-Regrettable

  Bio-Regrettable

9" x 11.5" pen and ink on paper

 

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