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Blender Kitty Comics Archive 4

Time Management: Spending so much time drawing a comic strip for so few eyesballs began to wear on me once my New York Press connection dried up. Around 2006 I started making the Profiles in Confusion single frame comics, which required less room for drawing and more room for writing. This allowed for a faster turnaround time on strips. (These subsequent strips reside on other pages within my comics portal.)

French Kiss comicHot Monkey Love comicMoonlight Sonata comicProjectile Vomit comicThe Practioner comicDental Floss comicSurreal Artist comicFetus in Tea comicOld Boy comicSea Shell comicDental Partial comicPolice Tape comicSpring Break comicSilverfish comicTundra Love Song comicTeach a Man to Fish comicThe Feared comicMichael Jackson comicLeft Surprise on Carpet comicMad Cow comic

Inspiration: I was a poor reader at school, and only developed an interest in writing much later. Today I fully appreciate the genius of Jack Kirby: his draftsmanship, his ability to imagine pictorial space, architecture, machinery, landscape, imagery characters, and foreshortened anatomy. The speed at which he drew was impossible by any reasonable measure, and his deftness in carrying out the task was doubly impossible. My own attempts at action drawing (seen in my serial tale for Blender Kitty) are weak tea compared to his.

Basil Wolverton was more my speed when it came to drawing comics. As for writing, The New Yorker cartoons were as cleverly written as they were drawn, although the drawing has grown less clever over the decades; and perhaps too the writing. Absurdist Wolverton and sophisticated New Yorker are polar-opposite types of humor; and yet I wanted to have both. Edward Gorey is perhaps as close as one can come in bridging this chasm, but he was more of a later influence.

Charles Addams and countless others are surely counted as influences, but mainly what I sought, when I sought it seriously, was to do everything that I wanted to do in the comic medium. It wasn’t until I became familiar with the works of Jim Woodring and Al Columbia that I received official permission to go my own way. These gentlemen, by my detective work, show strong autistic traits; and I have even heard Jim Woodring admit as much about himself in a videotaped lecture. Neither artist is particularly humorous in what they do, but both abandoned conventional narrative for aesthetic and conceptual reasons; and this is where my interests also lies.

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